fare thee well, for now, virginia {a walk through lewis ginter botanical gardens}

Monday, March 27:  It’s 3:30 a.m. on Monday morning.  My bags are packed and I’ll leave in about an hour for BWI airport.  My journey to Japan is about to begin. 🙂

This is the fourth time I will have lived and worked abroad. I taught Omani and Chinese university students on my two most recent gigs; the first time, I taught Korean elementary students.  I always leave home with excitement and some trepidation, mainly because I never know what the work environment will be like. Each of my experiences has been completely different from the others. I never worry about the travel, because each place offers limitless exploration potential.  I’ve rarely been disappointed in my travels.  I’ve enjoyed each country in which I’ve lived while at the same time struggling to deal with cultural differences. I think every person should live in another country at least once in his or her life; it’s an eye-opening experience to be a foreigner, a minority, in another land.  It gives one an understanding of what immigrants to our country must go through when they embark to the strange world that is America.

I don’t know why, but for this flight they recommend we get to the airport 2 1/2 hours ahead of flight time, which is 7:59 a.m. That seems awfully early to me, but who am I to question these crazy rules?

I made a day trip to Richmond on Monday, March 20, to visit my two kids.  Before meeting them, I went for a walk around one of my favorite gardens, Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden.  I got a glimpse of spring here in Virginia, but now I’ll have to leave it behind. I’ll be immersed in Japan for full-on spring and through the heat of the summer. Tokyo’s weather is much like ours – cool and rainy in the spring, hot and humid in summer.  It will be similar to Korea’s weather as well.

Butterfly bench at Lewis Ginter
Conservatory
tulips and such

Inside the conservatory, I found orchids and tropical plants.

Outside, I found a Japanese tea house and garden, a children’s garden and tree house, and a pond.

to the Japanese tea house
pretty pond
pretties on the path
green and red leaves
Japanese tea house
all abloom
A Celebration of Resourceful Women
Kids Tree House
Kids Tree House
Kids Tree House on Sydnor Lake
orchids in the conservatory
orchids in the conservatory
orchids in the conservatory
orchids in the conservatory
orchids in the conservatory
orchids in the conservatory
orchids in the conservatory
in the conservatory
orchids in the conservatory
delicacies
Palms
tulips
tulips
gingerbread house
bunches of flowers
fir
arbor

I hope to see you all in Japan!  You can follow my adventures here:  catbird in japan.

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6 thoughts on “fare thee well, for now, virginia {a walk through lewis ginter botanical gardens}

  1. Wow, aren’t those orchids wonderful. What a variety of colours. For international flights leaving Australia, it’s standard practice to be at the airport at least 2 hours early, and 3 hours is recommended. It’s always been that way.

  2. I hope your journey to Japan went smoothly. I hear they have new search procedures in place now for all flights. Perhaps that’s why they wanted you there so early. The new, more extensive pat-downs take more time.
    The gardens look so beautiful and I thoroughly enjoyed the orchids. A feast for the eyes. I’m going to put the Lewis Ginter Botanical Gardens on my list of things to do while we’re living here. It’s less than 4 hours drive time which isn’t too bad. I don’t think I’ve ever been to Richmond. Through it, maybe, but never visited the city.

    1. Thanks Robin. My journey was a smooth one, thank goodness. I was leaving the country, so didn’t have any extensive search procedures, but I fear what I’ll encounter on my way home in August. I do highly recommend Lewis Ginter. You’ll be happy if you do visit. I enjoy Richmond; it has a lot of character. Maybe because my kids live there and know what to do; also, I lived there for over a year in 1988. 🙂

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