the national mall: the smithsonian castle, the enid a. haupt garden, & the national carousel

Saturday, December 7:  The Enid A. Haupt Garden is a 4.2 acre garden in front of the Smithsonian Castle in Washington, D.C.  Created in 1987, the design of its three distinct gardens reflects the cultural and aesthetic influences celebrated in the Smithsonian Castle and the surrounding museums.

entrance to the enid a. haupt garden
entrance to the enid a. haupt garden
enid a haupt garden and the smithsonian castle
enid a haupt garden and the smithsonian castle
the enid a. haupt garden
the enid a. haupt garden
the enid a. haupt garden
the enid a. haupt garden

The Fountain Garden is modeled after the Alhambra, the 14th century Moorish palace and fortress in Spain (andalucía: granada’s alhambra).  It sits beside the National Museum of African Art.

the fountain garden
the fountain garden
sculpture in the fountain garden
sculpture in the fountain garden

The Moongate Garden, beside the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, gets its design inspiration from the Temple of Heaven, a 15th century religious complex in China (**the journey, “moon fresh” jerry, the temple of heaven & an acrobatic extravaganza).

the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery
the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery
view of the Castle from the Moongate Garden
view of the Castle from the Moongate Garden

The Andrew Jackson Downing Urn was designed in honor of Andrew Jackson Downing, who in 1850 transformed the Mall into the nation’s first landscaped public park using informal, romantic arrangements of circular carriage drives and plantings of rare American trees.  Downing’s design endured until 1934, when the Mall was restored to Pierre L’Enfant’s 1791 plan.  Downing, the father of American landscape architecture, designed the White House and Capitol grounds.

Andrew Jackson Downing Urn
Andrew Jackson Downing Urn
Andrew Jackson Downing Urn
Andrew Jackson Downing Urn
Andrew Jackson Downing Urn
Andrew Jackson Downing Urn
parting shots of the smithsonian castle
parting shots of the smithsonian castle

Near the Smithsonian Castle is the Carousel on the National Mall.  The Carousel on the Mall was built by the Allen Herschell Company in 1947.  It’s known as a traveling machine.  The horses are four abreast, all jumping.  The Sea Dragon, added later, is the most popular seat on the carousel.   It is the only operating carousel in Washington, D.C.

the Sea Dragon on the Carousel on the National Mall
the Sea Dragon on the Carousel on the National Mall
the national carousel
the carousel on the national mall
the carousel
the carousel

Finally, in the middle of the National Mall, I can see the Washington Monument at one end and the Capitol at the other.  The Washington Monument’s 500 tons of scaffolding is now coming down, little by little.  The scaffolding enabled workers to perform $15 million in earthquake damage repairs, beginning early this year. The monument will reopen in spring 2014.

the Washington Monument, with the scaffolding half removed
the Washington Monument, with the scaffolding half removed
the U.S. Capitol
the U.S. Capitol

Stay tuned for further episodes of Washington’s sights as I eventually carve out time to revisit them all. 🙂

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12 thoughts on “the national mall: the smithsonian castle, the enid a. haupt garden, & the national carousel

  1. Now this is more like what I enjoy, though the Alhambra gardens are far better than the enid. a. haupt version (IMO). Look forward to seeing more of Washington. How long are you there for Cathy?

    1. Haha, yes, this “garden,” if you can even call it that, is not even a close approximation to the Alhambra. Nothing can beat that! I actually live in northern Virginia, in a suburb of Washington, so I’ll be here indefinitely. 🙂

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