of barns & covered bridges ~ crossing the mason-dixon line

Saturday, September 21:  After leaving Emmitsburg, Maryland with directions in hand from the owner of the Holy Grounds Cafe, I follow a number of country roads in search of some covered bridges.  To my surprise, I cross over the Mason-Dixon line into Pennsylvania.

I pass a number of barns along the way.

a barn just being a barn
a barn just being a barn
another barn
another barn
Another barn
Another barn
threatening skies
threatening skies
rustic barn
rustic barn
abandoned barn?
abandoned barn?
i love the overgrown look of this barn
I love the overgrown look of this barn
barn taken over by nature
barn taken over by nature

The Sachs Covered Bridge is just over the Pennsylvania line.  It was built in 1852 by David S. Stone and is a lattice-truss bridge that extends 100 feet across Marsh Creek.  The bridge was also known as the Sauches Covered Bridge at the time of the Battle of Gettysburg. It sits in the Gettysburg National Military Park and was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1980.

Sachs Covered Bridge
Sachs Covered Bridge

During the American Civil War, both the Union and Confederate Armies used the bridge in the Battle of Gettysburg and its aftermath (1863).

Sachs Covered Bridge
Sachs Covered Bridge

The bridge was closed to automobiles in 1968.  In 1996, it was damaged by floods but it was restored by Adams County as a scenic bridge.

Sachs Covered Bridge
Sachs Covered Bridge
Sachs Covered Bridge
Sachs Covered Bridge
Sachs Covered Bridge
Sachs Covered Bridge
Sachs Covered Bridge
Sachs Covered Bridge
Lattice-truss design of Sachs Covered Bridge
Lattice-truss design of Sachs Covered Bridge

I never find the second covered bridge that I’ve heard about.  After this little dip into Pennsylvania, I head south as the skies that have been threatening all morning open up.  All I see through the rest of my drive home are my windshield wipers and sheets of rain all around.

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15 thoughts on “of barns & covered bridges ~ crossing the mason-dixon line

    1. Yes, lots of history as Richmond, Virginia was the capital of the Confederacy and of course Washington is nearby too, so it’s a place where both Civil War and Revolutionary War battles were fought! I love those barns too!

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