travel theme: distance {the march on washington & “i have a dream”}

Monday, September 2:  This week was a big deal in Washington as the country celebrated the 50 year anniversary of the August 28, 1963 “March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom,” accompanied by Martin Luther King, Jr.’s “I have a dream” speech.  (For more about what was happening at that tumultuous time in the USA, see the Atlantic’s article: 50 Years Ago: The World in 1963).

I decide to go into Washington today, during the Labor Day holiday, to photograph the view from the Lincoln Memorial across the Reflecting Pool to the Washington Monument.  In a famous photograph, Martin Luther King, Jr. stands on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial and gives a famous speech that includes these words (For the rest of his speech see Martin Luther King, Jr.: I Have a Dream):

And so even though we face the difficulties of today and tomorrow, I still have a dream. It is a dream deeply rooted in the American dream.

I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal.”

I have a dream that one day on the red hills of Georgia, the sons of former slaves and the sons of former slave owners will be able to sit down together at the table of brotherhood.

I have a dream that one day even the state of Mississippi, a state sweltering with the heat of injustice, sweltering with the heat of oppression, will be transformed into an oasis of freedom and justice.

I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.

I have a dream today!

Today’s view is different than the one above.  For one, today is 50 years at a distance from the 1963 historic moment.  The only crowds today are tourists, wandering haphazardly around.  The Washington Monument, in the distance, is now covered in scaffolding for renovations after it sustained structural damage during the 2011 earthquake.  And my pictures, unlike those taken in 1963, are in color.   Except for the one below.  And of course, Martin Luther King, Jr. is absent as he was, sadly, assassinated on April 4, 1968.

The Reflecting Pool and the Washington Monument today
The Reflecting Pool and the Washington Monument today
The Lincoln Memorial
The Lincoln Memorial
Abraham Lincoln, 16th President of the United States
Abraham Lincoln, 16th President of the United States
Abraham Lincoln at the Lincoln Memorial
Abraham Lincoln at the Lincoln Memorial
The view from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial across the Reflecting Pool to the scaffolded Washington Monument
The view from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial across the Reflecting Pool to the scaffolded Washington Monument
Reflecting pool & Washington Monument
Reflecting pool & Washington Monument
the Reflecting Pool and Washington Monument
the Reflecting Pool and Washington Monument

I also decide to stop by the Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial, which was just completed on August 28, 2011, 48 years after the “March on Washington.”

entrance to the Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial
entrance to the Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial
Words of Martin Luther King, Jr.
Words of Martin Luther King, Jr.

From the National Park Service website about the memorial: August 28, 2011, the 48th anniversary of the groundbreaking March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom witnessed the dedication of the Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial. It is fitting that on this date, reminiscent of the defining moment in Dr. King’s leadership in the Civil Rights movement; in the form of solid granite, his legacy is further cemented in the tapestry of the American experience. His leadership in the drive for realization of the freedoms and liberties laid down in the foundation of the United States of America for all of its citizens, without regard to race, color, or creed is what introduced this young southern clergyman to the nation. The delivery of his message of love and tolerance through the means of his powerful gift of speech and eloquent writings inspire to this day, those who yearn for a gentler, kinder world . His inspiration broke the boundaries of intolerance and even national borders, as he became a symbol, recognized worldwide of the quest for civil rights of the citizens of the world (National Park Service: Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial: History & Culture).

looking back at the entrance to the Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial
looking back at the entrance to the Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial
Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial
Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial
Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial
Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial
Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial
Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial
Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial
Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial

And a quote to think about.  I think I need this one myself now.

Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial
Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial

For other takes on Ailsa’s challenge at Where’s my backpack? see Travel Theme: Distance.

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4 thoughts on “travel theme: distance {the march on washington & “i have a dream”}

  1. I haven’t visited DC since the MLk memorial was erected. I’d like to see it, and this week would have been the perfect time. Ah, well…I’m also planning to visit the national historic site in Atlanta.

    1. Ruth, that was the first time I saw the MLK memorial myself, since I’ve been gone for 3 years and it was just constructed 2 years ago. Washington is great for its many FREE memorials and museums. 🙂 I don’t even know about the national historic site in Atlanta. 🙂

  2. Lovely post, Cathy. I enjoyed seeing Washington with you. I’d never seen that Martin Luther King sculpture before.
    We have a whole different kettleful of problems today, don’t we? Take care 🙂

    1. I’d never seen the Martin Luther King sculpture either, Jo! It was just built two years ago, while I was away. It was pretty cool. Yes, we do have a whole different set of problems today, don’t we?

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